Who publishes Transparency Reports?
Here is an updated list of the ICT companies currently publishing transparency reports with a high-level guide to the type of data being reported.
AOL
Apple
AT&T
Cloudflare
Comcast
Credo
Dropbox
Deutsche Telekom
Facebook
Google
Internet Archive
LeaseWeb
LinkedIn
Mapbox
Microsoft
Pinterest
Posteo
Rogers Communications
Silent Circle
Sonic.net
SpiderOak
TekSavvy
TeliaSonera
Telstra
Telus
Time Warner Cable
Tumblr
Twitter
Verizon
Vodafone
Wickr
Wikpedia
Wordpress
Yahoo
* TeliaSonera includes secret police requests for Finland and Sweden but aggregates the numbers with total law enforcement requests.
Edit 1: Added Telus to the list, thanks @RonDeibert!
Edit 2: @Patrik_Hiselius clarified that secret police requests are included in TeliaSonera’s report

Who publishes Transparency Reports?

Here is an updated list of the ICT companies currently publishing transparency reports with a high-level guide to the type of data being reported.

  1. AOL
  2. Apple
  3. AT&T
  4. Cloudflare
  5. Comcast
  6. Credo
  7. Dropbox
  8. Deutsche Telekom
  9. Facebook
  10. Google
  11. Internet Archive
  12. LeaseWeb
  13. LinkedIn
  14. Mapbox
  15. Microsoft
  16. Pinterest
  17. Posteo
  18. Rogers Communications
  19. Silent Circle
  20. Sonic.net
  21. SpiderOak
  22. TekSavvy
  23. TeliaSonera
  24. Telstra
  25. Telus
  26. Time Warner Cable
  27. Tumblr
  28. Twitter
  29. Verizon
  30. Vodafone
  31. Wickr
  32. Wikpedia
  33. Wordpress
  34. Yahoo

* TeliaSonera includes secret police requests for Finland and Sweden but aggregates the numbers with total law enforcement requests.

Edit 1: Added Telus to the list, thanks @RonDeibert!

Edit 2: @Patrik_Hiselius clarified that secret police requests are included in TeliaSonera’s report

Towards Information Interdependence

Internet governance governance is influenced through tensions of both domestic and international policies. In 2010 Mueller suggested four policy areas drove internet governance debates: intellectual property protection, content control, cyber security, and critical internet resources,1 a list that should be updated to include surveillance and data retention. Debates around these issues illuminate overlapping tensions between states employing Westphalian ideologies to enforce territorial policy regimes to exclude outside influence, states others attempting to affirm domestic authority including through data localization proposals, and states seeking extraterritorial control of content or access to data.

The future growth of the internet will potentially destabilize existing power dynamics. What is needed is a third-way approach that provides a middle ground between extraterritorial policy regimes and domestic sovereignty and offers a way forward for the swing states in the internet governance debate. Following an analysis of sovereignty in debates of internet governance, this paper offers information interdependence as a way forward with examples across five issue areas that impact internet governance debates.

Continue reading in Beyond NETMundial: The Roadmap for Institutional Improvements to the Global Internet Governance Ecosystem or download the article here.

Who is publishing transparency reports?
Updated List 
Here is a list of the ICT companies currently publishing transparency reports and a brief overview of what is being reporting. Links the the reports are below.
AOL
Apple
Apple’s National Security Letter Disclosure
AT&T
Cloudflare
Comcast
Credo
Dropbox
Deutsche Telekom
Facebook
Google
Internet Archive
Lease Web
LinkedIn
Mapbox
Microsoft
Pinterest
Posteo
Rogers Communications
Silent Circle
Sonic.net
SpiderOak
TekSavvy
Telestra
Time Warner Cable
Tumblr
Twitter
Verizon
Vodafone
Wickr
Wordpress
Yahoo
(Last updated 2 July 2014, thanks @lawyerpants, @BeckLindsay, and @LizWoolery!)

Who is publishing transparency reports?

Updated List 

Here is a list of the ICT companies currently publishing transparency reports and a brief overview of what is being reporting. Links the the reports are below.

  1. AOL
  2. Apple
  3. Apple’s National Security Letter Disclosure
  4. AT&T
  5. Cloudflare
  6. Comcast
  7. Credo
  8. Dropbox
  9. Deutsche Telekom
  10. Facebook
  11. Google
  12. Internet Archive
  13. Lease Web
  14. LinkedIn
  15. Mapbox
  16. Microsoft
  17. Pinterest
  18. Posteo
  19. Rogers Communications
  20. Silent Circle
  21. Sonic.net
  22. SpiderOak
  23. TekSavvy
  24. Telestra
  25. Time Warner Cable
  26. Tumblr
  27. Twitter
  28. Verizon
  29. Vodafone
  30. Wickr
  31. Wordpress
  32. Yahoo

(Last updated 2 July 2014, thanks @lawyerpants@BeckLindsay, and @LizWoolery!)

New article on Advocacy and ACTA in Europe

I have a new article out in the Journal of Information Policy on the ACTA debate in Europe analyzing the role of civil society along the dimensions of multi-level politics as well as the need to differentiate between public advocacy (such as protests) and institutional advocacy (engaging with policy making institutions). My findings document that advocacy efforts did defeat ACTA, but it took more than the decentralized protests that are more commonly associated with internet advocacy. Key factors in defeating ACTA were the five-years of network building preceding the protests, the catalyzing role of the defeat of SOPA/PIPA in the United States and early protests in Poland, and the central role played by civil society organizations in bridging horizontal networks of decentralized protests to the institutional body of European Parliament.